Book Review: Oh Myyy! (There Goes the Internet)

I was interested in reading George Takei’s book because he discusses how he grew his social media presence (while I’m just starting out mine in this blog).  Like his Facebook page, George uses photos in his book (I have the Kindle version) to illustrate his points. He points out that posting funny images on  Facebook results in more likes and shares than posts without images; I can see how images in his actual book make reading it more enjoyable and something that can be shared (which I ended up showing to a few friends).

The book is very humorous and as I was reading I felt like I could hear Uncle George’s voice narrating in my head.  Chapters aren’t too long, and focus on a specific topic like Twitter, Facebook, science fiction, the apocalypse, and bacon (yes, bacon!)  George also talks about certain celebrities he does not agree with (or those who do not agree with him), such as his disappointment with then-Governor Schwarzenegger’s veto on the California same-sex marriage bill or Gilbert Gottfried’s antagonistic tweeting.  He discusses some of the frustrating aspects of sharing one’s life on social media such as dealing with trolls, Grammar Nazis, and George Fakei (an online impostor).

Other general highlights I enjoyed:

  • Learning more about George’s activism, although he noted that some of his fans prefer him to stay on the lighter, funnier side of things.
  • The story behind his “Happy Dance” which can be seen here.
  • Demystifying how Facebook and EdgeRank works (like why I can’t see all posts by people I am following, including George’s page.)

Overall, the book is honest and sincere, as well as entertaining.  George provides  helpful insights into building one’s online presence, funny stories about himself, and some of his key successes with social media and activism.  Inspiring and fun to read.  I’d love to meet George someday and have him sign my Kindle cover (right next to Grace Lee Boggs and Edgar Schein).

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